Amur Honeysuckle (Lonicera maackii)

Opposite, simple leaves with iconic red berries

Birds and mammals love the berries, so these trees can spread very quickly (Tree of Heaven, n.d.).

 

Tree of Heaven (Ailanthus altissima)

Crushed leaves have a strong peanut butter odor

Pinnately compound leaves with many leaflets

Tree of Heaven, invasive to the US, is native to parts of China, Taiwan, and north Korea (Tree of Heaven, n.d.).

 

Grapevine (Vitis riparia)

Simple, alternate, toothed, lobed leaves

According to EdibleWildFood.com, “Grape vines grow thicker and higher than most other native vines” (Wild Grape Vine: Pictures, Flowers, Leaves & Identification | Vitis Riparia, n.d.).

 

Garlic Mustard (Alliaria petiolata)

Low-growing rosette, single-stemmed, smells like garlic

Thrives in moist, shady, rich forestsĀ (Alliaria Petiolata (Garlic-Mustard): Go Botany, n.d.).

 

References:

Alliaria petiolata (garlic-mustard): Go Botany. (n.d.). Retrieved October 4, 2020, from https://gobotany.nativeplanttrust.org/species/alliaria/petiolata/
Bush Honeysuckles. (n.d.). MDC Discover Nature. Retrieved October 4, 2020, from https://nature.mdc.mo.gov/discover-nature/field-guide/bush-honeysuckles
Tree of Heaven. (n.d.). Retrieved October 4, 2020, from http://webpage.pace.edu/naturespace/Tree%20of%20Heaven.htm
Wild Grape Vine: Pictures, Flowers, Leaves & Identification | Vitis riparia. (n.d.). Retrieved October 4, 2020, from https://www.ediblewildfood.com/wild-grape-vine.aspx